Sundust | An Art Collection By Sara Golish

sundust summer solstice collection by sara golish

Sara Golish is an artist I’ve mentioned  before she’s Canadian born and  fuels her talent mostly into creating African art. She knew her passion was to become an artist since putting pencil to paper as a toddler and her work now spreads across drawings, painting , sketches and sculptures.

Her new collection ‘Sundust’ is a set of tribal inspired portraits,  an ode to various indigenous tribes and deities of Africa and follows the same artistic aesthetic as Golish’s previous series Moondust.

SUNDUST is ‘a salute to the fertility of the sun goddess through ten portraits of women from the continent most touched by the sun’s embrace – Africa. Compelled by the lack of female personified sun deities, Golish aims to revise and re-examine the male dominated sun god through the recasting of the past in order to re-envision the future. Released on the eve of summer solstice, the ladies of SUNDUST represent and celebrate all that is light, powerful, and life-giving’.

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Sun Goddess Anyanwu – [An-yan-wew] “Eye of the Sun” or “The Light” is an Igbo deity from Nigeria that is believed to dwell in the sun. Alaigbo (Igboland) was referred to as the land of the rising sun. Her gold feathered crown and solar earrings emanate like the sun’s rays shining down on her inhabitants to bask in her glory.

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Sun Goddess Asis – [’ei,sis] Derived from the word Asista (meaning the sun), is the sun goddess of the Kalenjin people in western Kenya, whose religion is based upon this one supreme goddess. She bares the symbol of the sun through the curvature of her beaded necklace, her circular braids and the rounded poufs of her hair.

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Sun Goddess Asis – [’ei,sis] Derived from the word Asista (meaning the sun), is the sun goddess of the Kalenjin people in western Kenya, whose religion is based upon this one supreme goddess. She bares the symbol of the sun through the curvature of her beaded necklace, her circular braids and the rounded poufs of her hair.

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Sun Goddess Mukuru – [MOW-KOW-row] The divinity of the Himba nomadic tribe in northern Namibia, who use ancestral fire to communicate with the spirits of their predecessors. She was born by the fire sprinkled by lightning shooting the holy Omumborombonga tree. Mukuru wears a ring and sundial on her forehead and circular necklaces as emblems of the sun.

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Sun Goddess Nefertum – [nei fer’tem] “Goddess of the Sunrise”. As a solar deity from Egyptian Mythology, she represents both the first sunlight and the delightful smell of the Egyptian blue lotus flower, Nymphaea caerulea, protecting and giving life over northern Africa. She dons disk shaped earrings as a symbol of the sun and a lotus headdress for her association with the plant.

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Sun Goddess Nomalanga – [no mah LENG gah] The “Sun” or “Mother of Sunshine”, hails from the Ndebele tribe of Zimbabwe in southern Africa. Her neck rings and round beaded necklaces mimic a solar essence, advancing to the heavens.

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Sun Goddess Nyambi – [Nyam-bee] The sky goddess who inhabits the sun for the Barotse [or Lozi] people from western Zambia. She wears 3 sun disks oh her head and face paint along her cheeks as representations of the sun setting in the horizon at dusk.

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Sun Goddess Orun – “Sun” in Yoruba from the people in southwestern Nigeria and southern Benin of west Africa, rises high above her home each morning and returns there in the evening. The curved plate at the base of her shoulders and collarbone are the depiction of the rising sun at dawn as she ascends to provide the daily lifeblood to her people.

 

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Sun Goddess Taitu – [TIE-too] “The Sun”. This sun goddess ensures the all around development of life as she reigns over Ethiopian terrain. The medallion on her forehead exemplifies the shape of the sun, giving birth to all organisms.

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Sun Goddess Tsehai – [Ts’ä hay] “The Sun/Sunshine” goddess of the Karo people in the Omo Valley who inhabit the eastern banks of the Omo river in Ethiopia. Her circular body paint, mini afro puffs, necklaces and painted dots, all speak to solar embodiment.

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Credit | Akatasia